If You’re A Snowflake That Triggers Easily When Discussing Racism, Don’t Read This “White Lives Matter” Parody Blog Post. [UPDATED: 2/22/2020]

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Now without further ado….

I just visited the website of Black Lives Matter “What We Believe” page for the first time and some of what I read was astounding! Is this the kind of activism that’s now considered “acceptable” in our society?

DISCLAIMER: In an effort to see how people in our society would react, I took the exact words found on Black Lives Matters’ “What We Believe” page on June 23, 2020 where they proclaim what they believe (https://blacklivesmatter.com/what-we-believe/) [UPDATE 6/22/2020: As of today, Black Lives Matter has deleted the page, anyone want to wonder why] and replaced the word “Black” with the word “White” throughout the beliefs proclamation and shifted some of the context (4th paragraph with Trayvon Martin content) as if it was written from the point of view of a white person that created a White Lives Matter group. Here is the result…

Remember these words are really not mine, the organization White Lives Matter does not actually exist and I’m not suggesting in any way that it should exist. This is, in a sense, a non-comical parody of the posted beliefs of Black Lives Matters presented to make a point.

*****

Four years ago, what is now known as the White Lives Matter Global Network began to organize. It started out as a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission was to build local power and to intervene when violence was inflicted on White communities by the state and vigilantes.

In the years since, we’ve committed to struggling together and to imagining and creating a world free of anti-Whiteness, where every White person has the social, economic, and political power to thrive.

White Lives Matter began as a call to action in response to state-sanctioned violence and anti-White racism. Our intention from the very beginning was to connect White people from all over the world who have a shared desire for justice to act together in their communities. The impetus for that commitment was, and still is, the rampant and deliberate violence inflicted on us by the state.

Enraged by the false racism claims in the killing of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman, and provoked by the absurd 31-day takeover of the Florida State Capitol by POWER U and the Dream Defenders, it has become clear that there is an anti-White movement afoot. A year later, we set out together on the White Lives Matter Freedom Ride to Ferguson, in search of justice for the Police Officer that was falsely tared in the public as a racist and falsely accused of murdering Mike Brown when he had his hands up when in fact Brown did not have his hands up and he was in the process of attacking the police officer for the second time. We stand up for those who have been torn apart by anti-White racism. Forever changed, we returned home and began building the infrastructure for the White Lives Matter Global Network, which, even in its infancy, has become a political home for many.

Ferguson helped to catalyze a movement to which we’ve all helped give life. Organizers who call this network home have ousted anti-White politicians, won critical legislation to benefit White lives, and changed the terms of the debate on Whiteness around the world. Through movement and relationship building, we have also helped catalyze other movements and shifted culture with an eye toward the dangerous impacts of anti-Whiteness.

These are the results of our collective efforts.

The White Lives Matter Global Network is as powerful as it is because of our membership, our partners, our supporters, our staff, and you. Our continued commitment to liberation for all White people from anti-White racism means we are continuing the work of our ancestors and fighting for our collective freedom because it is our duty.

Every day, we recommit to healing ourselves and each other, and to co-creating alongside comrades, allies, and family a culture where each person feels seen, heard, and supported.

We acknowledge, respect, and celebrate differences and commonalities.

We work vigorously for freedom and justice for White people and, by extension, all people.

We intentionally build and nurture a beloved community that is bonded together through a beautiful struggle that is restorative, not depleting.

We are unapologetically White in our positioning. In affirming that White Lives Matter, we need not qualify our position. To love and desire freedom and justice for ourselves is a prerequisite for wanting the same for others.

We see ourselves as part of the global White family, and we are aware of the different ways we are impacted or privileged as White people who exist in different parts of the world.

We are guided by the fact that all White lives matter, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status, or location.

We make space for transgender brothers and sisters to participate and lead.

We are self-reflexive and do the work required to dismantle cisgender privilege and uplift White trans folk, especially White trans women who continue to be disproportionately impacted by trans-antagonistic violence.

We build a space that affirms White women and is free from sexism, misogyny, and environments in which men are centered.

We practice empathy. We engage comrades with the intent to learn about and connect with their contexts.

We make our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We dismantle the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” so that they can mother in private even as they participate in public justice work.

We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of hetero-normative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

We cultivate an inter-generational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, show up with the capacity to lead and learn.

We embody and practice justice, liberation, and peace in our engagements with one another.

*****

There you have it; this parody is basically the exact same thing as Black Lives Matters posted beliefs. If modern day social justice warriors or black people think that what is written above is equivalent to white supremacy and/or racism then they need to look in the mirror at their own hypocritical motives and what they themselves are actively promoting.

Black Lives Matters publicly proclaims that “we are unapologetically Black in our positioning”; they are literally putting their race identity above everything. When white people have stated things like that the black community immediately calls them racist and/or white supremacists and justifiably so and yet here we see that Black Lives Matter is proclaiming the same thing and somehow it’s socially acceptable. It is a societal cancer when this kind of racism is rationalized as being acceptable! Personally I thought we were all supposed to be identifying as being part of the human race and ignore all these divisional tribal subcategories, but what we’ve seen is there are groups of people that have been actively promoting tribal division for a number of years, Black Lives Matter is one of these groups.

When you get right down to the nitty-gritty of it; to a racist, everything is about race.

Black Lives Matter appears to be some kind of socially acceptable racist black supremacists organization that is demanding special treatment for blacks based solely on the color of their skin and not the content of their character. Black Lives Matter should not exist in a society such as ours in the same way that the KKK should not exist in a society such as ours, but BLM does exist, and it’s social and political clout is growing rapidly and what’s shocking is that the organization has become socially acceptable in-spite of it’s race based supremacist agenda. I’m not comparing BLM to the KKK in any way except that it’s a race based supremacist organization. The BLM organization should get back to the core of the prophetic society changing words of Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have A Dream” speech which I wrote about here; King is a true American hero, BLM is the epitome of a societal cancer that’s part of a movement that’s stripping core ethical beliefs from our society.

There are better, ethical and moral ways of accomplishing reasonable change in society without using blatant racism as a battering ram to force change down the throats of those they oppose. Martin Luther King Jr. knew this to be true, modern day race activists have forgotten this.

Think critically about what you’ve read here because these are the kinds of things that become building blocks for our future society, they can dramatically change our society.  Choices have consequences, what do you want our future society to be?

The Following is what was on the Black Lives Matter what we believe page that they deleted.

What We Believe

Four years ago, what is now known as the Black Lives Matter Global Network began to organize. It started out as a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission was to build local power and to intervene when violence was inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.

In the years since, we’ve committed to struggling together and to imagining and creating a world free of anti-Blackness, where every Black person has the social, economic, and political power to thrive.

Black Lives Matter began as a call to action in response to state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Our intention from the very beginning was to connect Black people from all over the world who have a shared desire for justice to act together in their communities. The impetus for that commitment was, and still is, the rampant and deliberate violence inflicted on us by the state.

Enraged by the death of Trayvon Martin and the subsequent acquittal of his killer, George Zimmerman, and inspired by the 31-day takeover of the Florida State Capitol by POWER U and the Dream Defenders, we took to the streets. A year later, we set out together on the Black Lives Matter Freedom Ride to Ferguson, in search of justice for Mike Brown and all of those who have been torn apart by state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Forever changed, we returned home and began building the infrastructure for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, which, even in its infancy, has become a political home for many.

Ferguson helped to catalyze a movement to which we’ve all helped give life. Organizers who call this network home have ousted anti-Black politicians, won critical legislation to benefit Black lives, and changed the terms of the debate on Blackness around the world. Through movement and relationship building, we have also helped catalyze other movements and shifted culture with an eye toward the dangerous impacts of anti-Blackness.

These are the results of our collective efforts.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network is as powerful as it is because of our membership, our partners, our supporters, our staff, and you. Our continued commitment to liberation for all Black people means we are continuing the work of our ancestors and fighting for our collective freedom because it is our duty.

Every day, we recommit to healing ourselves and each other, and to co-creating alongside comrades, allies, and family a culture where each person feels seen, heard, and supported.

We acknowledge, respect, and celebrate differences and commonalities.

We work vigorously for freedom and justice for Black people and, by extension, all people.

We intentionally build and nurture a beloved community that is bonded together through a beautiful struggle that is restorative, not depleting.

We are unapologetically Black in our positioning. In affirming that Black Lives Matter, we need not qualify our position. To love and desire freedom and justice for ourselves is a prerequisite for wanting the same for others.

We see ourselves as part of the global Black family, and we are aware of the different ways we are impacted or privileged as Black people who exist in different parts of the world.

We are guided by the fact that all Black lives matter, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status, or location.

We make space for transgender brothers and sisters to participate and lead.

We are self-reflexive and do the work required to dismantle cisgender privilege and uplift Black trans folk, especially Black trans women who continue to be disproportionately impacted by trans-antagonistic violence.

We build a space that affirms Black women and is free from sexism, misogyny, and environments in which men are centered.

We practice empathy. We engage comrades with the intent to learn about and connect with their contexts.

We make our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We dismantle the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” so that they can mother in private even as they participate in public justice work.

We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

We cultivate an intergenerational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, show up with the capacity to lead and learn.

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